Disaster and Risk Management Guides

To ensure successful technical application to disaster management, space-based information has to be seamlessly integrated into established policies, plans, operational procedures and infrastructure.

This section provides an overview by offering a summary of characteristics, impact and damage types, emergency action, mitigation, and further measures for the different types of disasters. Furthermore links to existing disaster management guides from different institutions have been compiled.

The information currently provided is by no means complete, and any user of this website is invited to contribute content and/or to provide feedback. Please use the contact form on this page to contact the editing team.

  1. Drought In general, drought is defined as an extended period - a season, a year, or several years - of deficient rainfall relative to the statistical multi-year average for a region. However, dozens of more specific drought definitions are used...
  2. Earthquake When there is a shaking and vibration at the surface of the earth caused by underground movement along a fault plane or by volcanic activity, then it is the time of earthquake. The scale of earthquake is commonly measured by Richter scale...
  3. Epidemic considered as a disaster because it is obviously affected people. Based on data and statistics from 1980-2008 the number of people killed was 183,278 people and the number of people affected was 19,411,394[1]. An epidemic is defined as the...
  4. [no-glossary]Extreme Temperature[/no-glossary] Changes in temperature extremes tend to follow mean temperature changes in many parts of the world. IPCC indicate that cold extreme cold extremes warm faster than warm extremes by about 30% – 40%...
  5. Flood A simple definition of flooding is water where it is not wanted. Another, more comprehensive definition of a flood is: A general and temporary condition of partial or complete inundation of normally dry land areas from overflow of inland or...
  6. Mass Movements Mass movements are massive failures of slope masses including rock, debris, soils and snow/ice (Parkash, National Institute of Disaster Management, New Delhi). These mass movements are sometimes associated with other disaster such as...
  7. Tsunami “Tsunami” is a Japanese word in which “tsu” means harbor and “nami” means wave. Thus the word means “harbor wave”. Tsunami is a series of waves that can travel at speeds averaging 450 (and up...
  8. Volcano volcano is a mountain opening downwards to the reservoir of molten rock towards the surface of earth. Volcanoes are made by the accrual of igneous products. As the pressure from gases in the molted rock becomes intense, the eruption takes...
  9. What is a wildfire? A wildfire is an unplanned, unwanted wildland fire including unauthorized human-caused fires[fn]NWCG (National Wildfire Coordinating Group), 2006, Glossary of Wildfire Terminology, p.179. http://www.fire.uni-freiburg.de/...

Comments

Sinkholes

There is one more phenomenon called sinkholes. Sinkholes are common where the rock below the land surface is limestone, carbonate rock, salt beds, or rocks that can naturally be dissolved by groundwater circulating through them.If there is not enough support for the land above the spaces then a sudden collapse of the land surface can occur. These collapses can be small, or they can be huge and can occur where a house or road is on top.

Pictorial evidence of sinkholes

To add with Haydean there are some pictorial evidence of Sinkholes occured in different parts of the world.

http://www.amusingplanet.com/2013/09/disastrous-sinkholes-from-around-wo...