Meteorological

Definition

A hazard caused by short-lived, micro- to meso-scale extreme weather and atmospheric conditions that last from minutes to days.

Related content on the Knowledge Portal

Événement

EO4GEO logo. Image: EO4GEO

EO4GEO aims to bridge the skills gap between the supply and demand of education and training in the space/geospatial sectors, fostering the uptake and integration of space/geospatial data and services in a broad range of application domains. 

The event includes sessions on:

  • Introduction to Copernicus and Services (with COVID-19 examples)
  • The role of Earth Observation in emergency situations
  • NO2 Air pollution monitoring 
  • Three case studies on how satellite data combined with other data is valued for agriculture, nature conservation and monitoring of forest for detection of fire and diseases
  • The role of EO in emergency situations
  • Maritime Spatial Planning. 
EGU 2020 logo. Image: EGU

EGU2020: Sharing Geoscience Online (#shareEGU20) brings part of the activities of the EGU General Assembly 2020 online. Participants will join meetings, share their research and discuss with colleagues.

The event will include topics such as:

  • Geochemistry, Mineralogy, Petrology Volcanology 
  • Hydrological Sciences
  • Natural Hazards 
  • Nonlinear Processes in Geosciences 
  • Ocean Sciences   
  • Planetary & Solar System Sciences 
  • Seismology  
  • Stratigraphy, Sedimentology & Palaeontology  
  • Soil System Sciences  
  • Solar-Terrestrial Sciences 
  • ... read more
Watching a Typhoon from Space with Sentinel-1

During this webinar, you will learn how to process and visualize Sentinel-1 data to look at a hurricane and the damage it inflicts using SNAP toolbox.

Studies show that typhoons, hurricanes and other extreme weather events have become more frequent as a result of ongoing climatic change and this trend is likely to continue. These extreme weather events carry substantial human and economic costs. A publication by the (EASAC) reports that economic losses due to thunderstorms in North America have doubled between 1980 and 2015.

Using remote sensing we can monitor the storms themselves and the damage they cause (for example identify the most severely damaged areas). In this exercise we will have look on how to use the three Sentinel-1 data products (SLC, GRD and OCN) to see different aspects of the typhoon Habibis and its effect.

Data Source

Climate Scale interactive web map
Publishing institution: Climate Scale
Climate Scale offers an easy to access, current climate variability and future climate projections, building on the consolidated experience of Vortex technology to physically downscale climate data to the resolution for local applications
Screenshot of GEDI
Publishing institution: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
The Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation (GEDI) produces high resolution laser ranging observations of the 3D structure of the Earth. GEDI’s precise measurements of forest canopy height, canopy vertical structure, and surface elevation greatly advance our ability to characterize important carbon and water cycling processes, biodiversity, and habitat. GEDI’s data on surface structure are valuable for weather forecasting, forest management, glacier and snowpack monitoring, and the generation of more accurate digital elevation models.
Publishing institution: European Space Agency (ESA)
ESA's Earth Observation Thematic Exploitation Platform (TEP) is a browser for satellite imagery and specific products on an environmental topic. The TEP platforms are divided into 7 categories: Coastal; Forstry; Geohazards; Hydrology; Polar; Urban; and Food Security. Each platform is a collaborative, virtual work environment providing access to EO data and the tools, processors and Information and Communication Technology resources required to work with them. TEP aims to bridge the gap between the users and the data and tools.

Actualités

The TIROS-1 satellite. Image: NASA

On 1 April 1960, NASA sent the Television Infrared Observation Satellite (TIROS-1) into space. TIROS-1 was developed during the 1950s and, after years of experimental programmes and attempts, became the world’s first weather satellite. Since weather satellites were a new technology at that time, the mission also tested various design issues for spacecraft, such as instruments, data, and operational parameters, in order to improve satellite applications for Earth-bound decisions. TIROS-1 thus paved the way for further weather satellite development and research. Today, weather satellites provide highly accurate and near-real-time measurements that can efficiently monitor and forecast extreme weather events, such as floods and droughts, as well as enhance the understanding of the climate and of the Earth as a whole.

TIROS-1 provided information about cloud formations around the globe. It orbited 450 miles above Earth and communicated with two command and... read more

Publishing date: 16/04/2020
Winds imaged by Aeolus. Image: ESA

The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), after months of careful testing, has started to operationally assimilate data from the European Space Agency's Aeolus satellite in its daily weather forecasts. Aeolus measurements have been considered ready for operational use as early as 14 months after the satellite launch, which is unusual for data collected from a new type of satellite. Aelous provides accurate and near-real time measurements that can improve weather forecasting and contribute to better preparedness for possible hazards.

The Aeolus satellite is the first of its kind as it is able to calculate atmospheric winds in cloud-free areas or winds throughout vertical wind columns. To date, satellites could estimate winds only from the movements of clouds, leaving gaps in observations where there are no clouds. Aeolus can improve weather forecasts, especially in the tropics, in the southern... read more

Publishing date: 23/03/2020

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