Harmful Algal Bloom

Algae bloom in Lake Winnipeg in the Canadian province of Manitoba, with Reindeer Island visible in the lower-right part of the image. Image: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2017), processed by ESA, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO.

Definition

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are proliferations of certain noxious and/or toxic micro- and macroalgae and cyanobacteria, regardless of their concentration, with negative impacts on aquatic ecosystems, and human health and wellbeing. HABs are naturally occurring phenomena that are also facilitated by anthropogenic pressures (including eutrophication, habitat modification and introduction of exogenous HAB organisms). HABs constitute a complex global problem that might increase in severity and frequency, and be expanded in biogeographic range, in our changing planet (GlobalHAB).

Facts and figures

Harmful algal blooms occur when colonies of algae grow out of control and produce toxic or harmful effects on people, fish, shellfish, marine mammals and birds. HABs occur naturally, but human activities that disturb ecosystems seem to play a role in their more frequent occurrence and intensity. Increased nutrient loadings and pollution, food web alterations, introduced species, water flow modifications and climate change all play a role. Studies show that many algal species flourish when wind and water currents are favorable. In other cases, HABs may be linked to “overfeeding.” This occurs when nutrients (mainly phosphorus and nitrogen) from sources such as lawns and agriculture flow into bays, rivers, and the sea, and build up at a rate that “overfeeds” the algae that exist normally in the environment. Some HABs appear in the aftermath of natural phenomena like sluggish water circulation, unusually high water temperatures, and extreme weather events like hurricanes, floods, and drought (NOAA).

HABs are natural processes that occur in all aquatic systems and cause worldwide problems with significant economic, socio-cultural, and human health consequences. There is considerable concern that some HABs and/or their associated impacts may be increasing and expanding globally due to a combination of natural and human-driven forcing, including climate change. In the past two decades, improvements in scientific understanding of the complex processes involved in HAB dynamics have contributed to better management of the risks associated with some harmful events (GlobalHAB).

Related content

Data Source

Publishing institution: Radiant Earth Foundation
The website: https://www.radiant.earth Help and Tutorials: https://help.radiant.earth/ Demos & Use Cases: https://demos.radiant.earth/
Publishing institution: NASA Earth Science Disasters Program
NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is a program for archiving and distributing Earth science data from multiple missions to users.
Publishing institution: OceanDataLab
The Ocean Virtual Laboratory is a web platform making satellite and in-situ data for ocean monitoring accessible. It presents one of multiple Syntool Web portals that promote the synergistic use of Ocean Remote Sensing data in a wider context of Oceanic and Atmospheric models or in-situ data. , ESA/SEOM Ocean Virtual Laboratory portal: SAR roughness Sentinel 1: Ocean Color: From Sentinel-2, Sentinel-3 and Meteosat. Chlorophyll: From VIIRS and MODIS Sea Surface Temperature, Sea level, Salinity, Wind, Current, Rain, Mean Square Slope, Sea ice concentration , ESA/DUE GlobCurrent portal: SAR roughness, Ocean Color, Chlorophyll, Sea surface temperature, Sea level, Salinity, Wind, Wave, Current, Rain, ESA SMOS Storm portal: Significant Wave height (SWH) Jason 2 and ALTIKA, SAR roughness Sentinel-1, Wind speed SMOS, SMAP, AMSR2 and ASCAT, wind barbs ASCAT, CNES Aviso'VIZ altimetry portal: Sea Surface Height Anomaly (SSHA) Jason-2 and SARAL, Sea Level Anomaly (SLA) Jason-2 and SARAL, Absolute Dynamic Anomaly (ADT) Jason-2 and SARAL, Mean Sea Level RIse, Sea Level Anomaly, Geostrophic current vectors and streamlines., ESA Sentinel3 Viewer: products from OLCI, SLSTR and SRAL sensors., CNES PEPS Sentinel-1 Ocean Viewer: SAR roughness Sentinel-1, ESA Sea Surface Salinity portal: SMOS salinity, SMAP salinity
Publishing institution: European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT)
Map Viewer that allows downloading and time series creation of meteosat products.
Publishing institution: Copernicus
The Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service provides various products and services for marine applications. These include a global ocean physical analysis and forecast, biogeochemistry analysis and weekly forecast, global ocean waves analysis and forecast and in-situ observations. To the parameters observed belong: temperature, salinity, chlorophyll concentrations and many more.
Publishing institution: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
NASA’s Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG) provides True Color, Chlorophyll and Sea Surface Temperature for download.
Publishing institution: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
NOAA's Ecoforecasting Map locates site at risk of HABs, names prevalent species at the site and links directly to Alerts and Bulletins (forecasts) for the respective regions. The HABS Data Portal, is the portal for the great lakes (Lake Erie) mapping in-situ data useful in mapping algal blooms in the region. The phytoplancton monitoring network is a webmap which includes current weather radar, sampling locations and oceanographic data (SST,Salinity)
Publishing institution: Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (UNESCO/IOC), EOMAP
The World Water Quality Information and Capacity Building Portal (IIWQ) is a webmap that illustrates data on turbidity, chlorophyll-a, total absorption as well as the EOMAP specific harmful algal bloom indicator (HAB indicator). Where access to in-situ data is available station values are presented.
Publishing institution: Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (UNESCO/IOC), EOMAP
The World Water Quality Information and Capacity Building Portal (IIWQ) is a webmap that illustrates data on turbidity, chlorophyll-a, total absorption as well as the EOMAP specific harmful algal bloom indicator (HAB indicator). Where access to in-situ data is available station values are presented.

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