Global Positioning System

Study to test smartphones as earthquake early warning

Smartphones can detect ground motion and warn others before strong shaking arrives (Image: NASA/Emiliano Rodriguez Nuesch)

A study led by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has shown smartphones and other personal electronic devices could be used as early warning systems for large earthquakes.

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Wed, 15/04/2015 - 14:12

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55 years of satellite navigation

Launch of satellite Transit 1B, April 13 1960 (Image: US Navy)

13 April 2015 was the 55th anniversary of the first navigation system reaching the orbit. The Transit 1B satellite was launched by NASA on 13 April 1960.

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Tue, 14/04/2015 - 14:46

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United States investigate the economic benefits of GPS

The U.S. National Space-Based Positioning, Navigation and Timing (PNT) Advisory Board is organizing a study to endorse the economic profit of GPS. "We have a new assignment . . . to discover and disclose the economic contributions of the Global Positioning System", Chairman Jim Schlesinger said in the advisory board meeting that took place on August 15, 2012.

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Publishing Date: 

Tue, 21/08/2012 - 12:25
Tue, 08/21/2012

Galileo Will Be Used for Emergency Management

With the first two Galileo In-Orbit Verification (IOV) satellites already in orbit, the European Space Agency (ESA) is currently pondering whether or not the spacecraft could also be used to manage distress calls and other types of

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Publishing Date: 

Thu, 08/03/2012 - 11:56
Thu, 03/08/2012

ISRO sets ball rolling for Indian ‘GPS' / navigation system

The first of India's own little regional positioning satellites to better the US military-owned GPS may be put up in sky this year. The seven-satellite constellation, called the Indian Regional Navigational Satellite System, when fully in place over the coming years, will be far more accurate than the GPS that the world depends on.

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Fri, 24/02/2012 - 16:05

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Fri, 02/24/2012

NASA pinning down 'here' better than ever

Before our Global Positioning System (GPS) navigation devices can tell us where we are, the satellites that make up the GPS need to know exactly where they are. For that, they rely on a network of sites that serve as "you are here" signs planted throughout the world. The catch is, the sites don't sit still because they're on a planet that isn't at rest, yet modern measurements require more and more accuracy in pinpointing where "here" is.

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Fri, 24/02/2012 - 15:46

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Fri, 02/24/2012
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