MSS

Kanopus-V

Public Private Partnership: 

0Public Private Partnership

Kanopus-V (also spelling of Canopus-V N1) is an Earth observation minisatellite mission of the Russian Space Agency, Roskosmos and ROSHYDROMET/Planeta. The overall objective is to monitor Earth's surface, the atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere to detect and study the probability of strong earthquake occurrence.

Instrument: 

  • MSS
  • Multispectral Imaging Spectrometer
  • Panchromatic Imaging Camera

Launch Date: 

Sun, 22/07/2012

Life span: 

5years

Landsat 5

Providers: 

Public Private Partnership: 

0Public Private Partnership

Landsat 5 was launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on March 1, 1984, and like Landsat 4, carried the Multispectral Scanner (MSS) and the Thematic Mapper (TM) instruments. Landsat 5 delivered Earth imaging data nearly 29 years - and set a Guinness World Record For 'Longest Operating Earth Observation Satellite', before being decommissioned on June 5, 2013.

Instrument: 

  • MSS
  • TM

Launch Date: 

Thu, 01/03/1984

Life span: 

3years

De-orbited: 

Wed, 05/06/2013

Landsat 3

Providers: 

Public Private Partnership: 

0Public Private Partnership

Landsat 3 was launched on March 5, 1978, three years after Landsat 2.

Instrument: 

  • MSS

Launch Date: 

Sun, 05/03/1978

Life span: 

1years

De-orbited: 

Wed, 07/09/1983

Landsat 2

Providers: 

Public Private Partnership: 

0Public Private Partnership

Landsat 2 was launched into space onboard a Delta 2910 rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California on January 22, 1975, two and a half years after Landsat 1. Originally named ERTS-B (Earth Resource Technology Satellite B), the spacecraft was renamed Landsat 2 prior to launch. The second Landsat was still considered an experimental project and was operated by NASA.
Landsat 2 carried the same sensors as its predecessor: the Return Beam Vidicon (RBV) and the Multispectral Scanner System (MSS).

Instrument: 

  • MSS

Launch Date: 

Wed, 22/01/1975

Life span: 

1years

De-orbited: 

Wed, 27/07/1983

Landsat 4

Providers: 

Public Private Partnership: 

0Public Private Partnership

Landsat 4 was launched on July 16, 1982. The Landsat 4 spacecraft was significantly different than that of the previous Landsats, and Landsat 4 did not carry the RBV instrument.
In addition to the Multispectral Scanner System (MSS) instrument, Landsat 4 (and Landsat 5) carried a sensor with improved spectral and spatial resolution, i.e., the new satellites could see a wider (and more scientifically-tailored) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum and could see the ground in greater detail. This new instrument was known as the Thematic Mapper (TM).

Instrument: 

  • MSS
  • TM

Launch Date: 

Fri, 16/07/1982

De-orbited: 

Tue, 14/12/1993

Landsat 1

Providers: 

Public Private Partnership: 

0Public Private Partnership

Landsat 1 was launched on July 23, 1972; at that time the satellite was known as the Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS). It was the first Earth-observing satellite to be launched with the express intent to study and monitor our planet’s landmasses. To perform the monitoring, Landsat 1 carried two instruments: a camera system built by the Radio Corporation of America (RCA) called the Return Beam Vidicon (RBV), and the Multispectral Scanner (MSS) built by the Hughes Aircraft Company. The RBV was supposed to be the prime instrument, but the MSS data were found to be superior.

Instrument: 

  • MSS

Launch Date: 

Sun, 23/07/1972

Life span: 

1years

De-orbited: 

Fri, 06/01/1978
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