Landsat 5

USGS: End of Mission for Landsat 5

On 21 December 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) announced that Landsat 5 will be decommissioned over the coming months, bringing to a close the longest-operating Earth observing satellite mission in history. By any measure, the Landsat 5 mission has been an extraordinary success, providing unprecedented contributions to the global record of land change. The USGS has brought the aging satellite back from the brink of failure on several occasions, but the recent failure of a gyroscope has left no option but to end the mission.

Publishing Date: 

Thu, 10/01/2013 - 08:51

Landsat 5 Mission in Jeopardy

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has stopped acquiring images from the 27-year-old Landsat 5 Earth observation satellite due to a rapidly degrading electronic component.

Landsat 5 was launched in 1984 and designed to last 3 years. The USGS assumed operation of Landsat 5 in 2001 and managed to bring the aging satellite back from the brink of total failure on several occasions following the malfunction of key subsystems. There is now an increasing likelihood that the Landsat 5 mission is nearing its end.

Publishing Date: 

Mon, 21/11/2011 - 11:00

Landsat 5 captures Missouri River flooding near Omaha

Landsat 5 captured an image of flooding occurring along the Iowa/Nebraska border on June 30, 2011. Flooding is still occurring on July 6, and Flood Warnings are still in effect from the National Weather Service.

The Landsat 5 image captured was an enlargement of the area just north of Omaha. The flood waters show up as very dark blue and, where the water is shallow, medium blue. In the image, the Interstate is cut off by flood waters, just south of Missouri Valley, Iowa, and about 20 miles north of Omaha.

Publishing Date: 

Thu, 07/07/2011 - 17:25

Satellite programs aid emergency crews battling wildfires

Multiple firefighting agencies are using imagery -- provided by federally funded Landsat 5 and 7, Aqua and Terra satellites -- to combat wildfires that continue to blaze across Arizona.

The satellites capture images of the Earth's surface and then, using color enhancements, firefighters can identify different regions most susceptible to wildfire burning. In the images, burn scars are red, ongoing fires are bright red, vegetation is green, smoke is blue and bare ground is tan-colored.

Publishing Date: 

Thu, 23/06/2011 - 14:44

Remote Sensing - Wildfire Gallery

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