Glacial Lake Outburst

The false-color images above show a glacial lake in the Himalayas nearly doubling in length over 30 years. Ice is represented as light blue, while significant meltwater is dark blue. Rocks are brown; vegetation is green. The growth of glacial lakes can increase the risk of flooding in nearby valleys. Image: NASA.

Definition

“Glacial lake outburst flood” (GLOF) is a phrase used to describe a sudden release of a significant amount of water retained in a glacial lake, irrespective of the cause. GLOFs are characterized by extreme peak discharges, often several times in excess of the maximum discharges of hydrometeorological induced floods, with an exceptional erosion/transport potential; therefore, they can turn into flow-type movements, e.g. GLOF-induced debris flows (Emmer).

Facts and figures

A GLOF may have diverse causes and subsequent mechanisms, for example accordingly on how water is released. Specific causes are related to specific mechanisms and not all their combinations are realistic scenarios. Moreover, specific subtypes of glacial lakes are susceptible to specific causes and subsequent mechanisms of outburst floods. Numerous studies have investigated the causes of lake outburst floods for specific lake subtypes and regions ; however, systematic investigation of the causes and mechanisms of GLOF, as well as database construction, are required in order to better understand the complex processes and, in turn, provide more effective hazard and risk management (Emmer).

 

The following direct causes of glacial lake outburst floods were documented:

  • Rapid slope movement into the lake
  • Heavy rainfall/snowmelt
  • Cascading processes (flood from a lake situated upstream)
  • Earthquake
  • Melting of ice incorporated in dam/forming the dam (including volcanic activity-triggered jökulhlaups)
  • Blocking of subsurface outflow tunnels (applies only to lakes without surface outflow or lakes with a combination of surface and subsurface outflow)
  • Long-term dam degradation (Emmer).

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The first generation SPOT satellites were built on the SPOT Mk.1 bus with a lifetime of three years.

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